.

22 April 2008

love is
Remember these
in the daily papers?
I was involved
in a long distance romance
when these were new.
I think I cut out
and saved each one,
taping them carefully
in a scrapbook,
those that I didn't include
with a love letter to Georgia.
What giddy young feelings surfaced
finding this today,
and realizing
the romance may be over
but the love,
a bit of it
will always
be there.

16 April 2008

My hands were busy through the day
I didn't have much time to play
The little games you asked me to,
I didn't have much time for you.
I'd wash your clothes, I'd sew and cook,
But when you'd bring your picture book
And asked me please to share your fun,
I'd say, "A little later, son."
I'd tuck you in all safe at night
And hear your prayers, turn out the light,
Then tiptoe softly to the door . . .
I wish I'd stayed a minute more.
For life is short, the years rush past . . .
A little boy grows up so fast.
No longer is he at your side,
His precious secrets to confide.
The picture books are put away,
There are no longer games to play,
No good-night kiss, no prayers to hear,
That all belongs to yesteryear.
My hands, once busy, now are still.
The days are long and hard to fill.
I wish I could go back and do
The little things you asked me to.
~author unknown

14 April 2008

There are times
when words are better left
unspoken

08 April 2008

Old photos have always captured my attention. And my imagination. Why would an old photo be relinquished to strangers? How did it get outside the family realm? Who are they? They loved, they laughed. They lived. What did they dream of and did they live long enough to see those dreams take flight? What memories did they leave in the hearts of those that knew them?


There's a blog I frequent, and just recently found, that offers images to those that might find some creative use for them. I have no thoughts of being crafty and reusing this, preferring instead to study it and let my thoughts wander.

They don't look that far back into the past, yet clothing tells us about a particular period. The half smiles on their faces let us know they are comfortable and at ease. What were they thinking as they stood there?

I've chosen a few others for you to gaze upon and let your mind take you to another time, another place. What do you find yourself thinking as you see these children? When I found the class shot, I immediately thought, "I wonder how many of these became doctors or pursued politics? How many became mothers, nurses, teachers?" Leave me a comment or two and share your thoughts with me. And as always, may we all find moments to love, times to laugh, and to live as if this were our last day on earth~